Tad Williams' Message Board

Hello, babies. Welcome to Earth. It's hot in the summer and cold in the winter. It's round and wet and crowded. At the outside, babies, you've got about a hundred years here. There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- 'God damn it, you've got to be kind.'
-    Kurt Vonnegut, 1922-2007

Welcome to the message board for tadwilliams.com. All comments are welcome, whether kudos or brickbats. However, please bear in mind that Tad would like this to be a friendly, civil message board, at least in the relations between users. We reserve the right to remove postings, or even ban postings, from anyone who crosses the boundary of reasonable taste. Basically, you can argue vigorously with someone, but watch your language, okay? We have a lot of young readers as well as grown-ups, so please show them some respect.

But the main requirement here is: have fun.


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#51 2005-11-18 16:38:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

FLOUR

All-Purpose Flour, unsifted

1 Tablespoon = 1/4 oz
1/4 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/2 oz
1/2 cup = 2 1/2 oz
2/3 cup = 3 1/4 oz
3/4 cup = 3 1/2 oz
1 cup = 5 oz

All-Purpose Flour, sifted

1/4 cup = 1 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 oz
2/3 cup = 2 3/4 oz
3/4 cup = 3 oz
1 cup = 4 oz

Cake Flour, unsifted

1/4 cup = 1 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 oz
2/3 cup = 2 3/4 oz
3/4 cup = 3 oz
1 cup = 4 oz

Cake Flour, sifted

1/4 cup = 1 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 1 3/4 oz
2/3 cup = 2 1/4 oz
3/4 cup = 2 1/2 oz
1 cup = 3 1/2 oz

Whole Wheat Flour, unsifted

1/4 cup = 1 1/2 oz
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 3/4 oz
2/3 cup = 3 3/4 oz
3/4 cup = 4 oz
1 cup = 5 1/2 oz

Whole Wheat Flour, sifted

1/4 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/2 oz
1/2 cup = 2 1/4 oz
2/3 cup = 3 oz
3/4 cup = 3 1/4 oz
1 cup = 4 1/2 oz

Source: Salter Electronic Scale Conversion Chart

Btw, if anyone's wondering why there's not a direct mathematical progression on some of these, well, I don't honestly know except to say these are standard equivalents used in professional baking. Professional bakers use weights rather than volume so recipes remain consistent. Measuring by volume alone can produce rather large differences in the finished product from one time to the next.

 

#52 2005-11-18 16:44:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

FLOUR, cont.

Bread Flour, sifted

1/4 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 1/2 oz
2/3 cup = 3 1/4 oz
3/4 cup = 3 3/4 oz
1 cup = 5 oz

Pasta Flour, Finely Ground Durum Wheat

1/4 cup = 1 1/2 oz
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 3/4 oz
2/3 cup = 3 3/4 oz
3/4 cup = 4 oz
1 cup = 5 1/2 oz

Buckwheat Flour, unsifted

1/4 cup = 1 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 oz
2/3 cup = 2 3/4 oz
3/4 cup = 3 oz
1 cup = 4 oz

Cornmeal

1/4 cup = 1 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 oz
2/3 cup = 2 1/2 oz
3/4 cup = 3 oz
1 cup = 4 oz

Cornstarch

1 Tablespoon = 1/4 oz
1/4 cup = 1 oz
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 2 oz
2/3 cup = 2 1/2 oz
3/4 cup = 3 oz
1 cup = 4 oz

Source: Salter .... same as before ;)

 

#53 2005-11-18 16:49:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

FATS

Butter

1 Tablespoon = 1/2 oz
2 Tbsp = 1 oz
4 Tbsp = 1/4 cup = 2 oz
6 Tbsp = 3 oz
8 Tbsp = 1/2 cup = 4 oz
10 Tbsp = 5 oz
12 Tbsp = 3/4 cup = 6 oz
14 Tbsp = 7 oz
16 Tbsp = 1 cup = 8 oz

Vegetable Shortening

1 Tbsp = 1/2 oz
1/4 cup = 1 3/4 oz
1/3 cup = 2 1/4 oz
1/2 cup = 3 1/2 oz
2/3 cup = 4 1/2 oz
3/4 cup = 5 1/4 oz
1 cup = 7 oz

Oil, vegetable or olive

1 Tbsp = 1/2 fluid oz
1/4 cup = 1 3/4 fl oz
1/3 cup = 2 1/2 fl oz
1/2 cup = 3 3/4 fl oz
2/3 cup = 5 fl oz
3/4 cup = 5 3/4 fl oz
1 cup = 7 1/2 fl oz

Source: Salter...

 

#54 2005-11-18 16:54:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Okay, I'm tired of typing for now. If anyone needs more, I've also got same equivalents for: Nuts & Peanut Butter, Liquids (water, milk, yogurt, broth/stock, various alcohols, etc), Miscellaneous (yeast, cocoa, chocolate chips, etc), Cereals and Grains, Vegetables, Meats, Poultry & Cheeses, and Condiments (ketchup, mustard, vinegar, mayo, etc.) Just let me know. :)

I also have some handy links for other helpful conversions. Had them posted in some earlier incarnation of the Pie, but I'll have to hunt them down again. Will post soon as I do. :)

 

#55 2005-11-18 20:43:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

@ Strangeshe:  You are so totally amazingly awesome!  And pretty darned great besides!


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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#56 2005-11-18 21:05:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

*blush* Aw shucks ma'am. Twarn't nuthin.

;)

 

#57 2005-11-18 21:20:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Okay I found one of the links I've used previously for conversions between UK and US stuff. I'll put it here, but will also edit my opening post to add it there for quick access when needed. (& as I locate the other links I've used I'll add those as well.)

Conversion Charts

 

#58 2005-11-18 21:22:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

& oh yeah, I really like this one:

You say aubergine, I say eggplant...

 

#59 2005-11-19 02:57:00

ylvs
Mantis
From: Art Central
Registered: 2001-06-19
Posts: 13410

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

originally posted by Cyan:
What do you mean by 'steam the apples with the lemon juice'? Do you mean just cook them together in a saucepan?

Put them in a pot put the lid on and let it boil for about five minutes.

The German word for steaming means cooking in a lidded pot with little liquid for a short time.


originally posted by Marth:
What is "viscid dough"? What consistency?

I had hoped to describe the consistency with the word "viscid". Another proof that dictionaries not nescessarily work!

Let me put it this way:
You get a smooth sticky dough that contains more liquid that the average - say bread dough.

I just checked the ditionary again: Does "pasty" make sense to you?

 

#60 2005-11-23 10:50:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Gingersnap Amaretto Cheesecake

Preheat oven to 375°F.

Crust:

1 3/4 cups Gingersnap cookie crumbs
1/4 cup toasted almond slivers
1 stick butter, melted

To make crumbs, break up the cookies into a food processor, and process on ‘pulse’ until the cookies look roughly crumbled.  Be careful not to over-processes - you want crumbs, not flour.  In a bowl, mix together the crumbs, almond slivers, and melted butter, until the crumbs are evenly moistened by the butter.  Press this mixture onto the bottom and about 1.5" - 2" up the sides of an 8- or 9- inch spring form pan.  (I use a smooth-bottomed glass for the bottom of the pan, and the back of a wooden spoon for up the sides.  I find it easier to do the sides first, then the bottom.)  Bake at 375° for about 12 minutes.  Remove from oven and set aside.

Filling:

24 oz. cream cheese
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon cornstarch, optional*
2 eggs & 1 egg yolk
1/4 cup Amaretto

Important note:  the filling ingredients should all be at room temperature, especially the cream cheese.

Using a hand-mixer on low speed, gradually mix the sugar, vanilla, flour, and cornstarch (optional) into the cream cheese, occasionally scraping off the sides of the bowl.  Be careful not to over-mix*, stop mixing as soon as you have a fairly smooth batter.  Add the eggs and mix until they are just incorporated.  Stir in the amaretto with a spoon.  Pour the batter into the prepared crust and bake at 375° for 40-45 minutes, or until the center of the cake jiggles a little, like firm jell-o.  Turn off the heat, leave the oven door ajar, and allow the cake to cool in the oven for about 1 hour.  Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool thoroughly.  Remove the side of the spring-form pan, and chill the cake in the refrigerator for at lease 2 hours before serving.

* The cornstarch helps prevent the cake from cracking.  Excessive mixing introduces air bubbles into the batter, which can cause the cake to crack.  The slow cooling process also helps prevent the cake from cracking.  You can also put a pan of boiling water in the bottom of the oven while the cake is baking; this introduces moisture which can also help prevent cracking.

PS:  This is entirely from memory so I hope I haven't forgotten anything.  ;-)

[ November 23, 2005: Message edited by: wicked cyan of the west ]


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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#61 2005-11-23 11:33:00

Em
Mantis
From: Didjabringabeeralong, XXX
Registered: 2004-12-28
Posts: 43864

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Sounds yummy, Cyan. But I cannot abide Amaretto (party, lots of Amaretto, me ... I don't remember any more (nor do I remember where I woke up) - honest!)

Wonder what could be substituted?


Yo, ho, yo ho. A pirate's life for me!

 

#62 2005-11-23 11:36:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Almond extract, add a teaspoon at a time until you like the flavor of the batter.


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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#63 2005-11-23 11:38:00

Em
Mantis
From: Didjabringabeeralong, XXX
Registered: 2004-12-28
Posts: 43864

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

U-m-m-m. Don't like almond extract either. Okay, okay. Quit looking at me like that. I basically don't like food, okay. Happy?

Vanilla, maybe? Really good vanilla? Not the stuff that passes as vanilla in the grocery.


Yo, ho, yo ho. A pirate's life for me!

 

#64 2005-11-23 11:45:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Well, I also do a variation where I use Oreo cookies (scrape out the filling) instead of gingersnap, and a double-shot of espresso and 2-3 teaspoons of orange extract instead of the amaretto.


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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#65 2005-11-23 11:56:00

Em
Mantis
From: Didjabringabeeralong, XXX
Registered: 2004-12-28
Posts: 43864

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

This looks like its going to be an enjoyable recipe to play with (and tasty too)!

*ponders flavor combinations*


Yo, ho, yo ho. A pirate's life for me!

 

#66 2005-11-23 12:00:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Auntie Em wrote:

This looks like its going to be an enjoyable recipe to play with (and tasty too)!

Yup, that's what I like about it.  For the batter, if you're not using other liquid flavorings (such as amaretto or espresso shots) then stir in 1/4 cup milk, and maybe 1/2 teaspoon of lemon zest.


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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#67 2005-11-23 12:01:00

Em
Mantis
From: Didjabringabeeralong, XXX
Registered: 2004-12-28
Posts: 43864

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Thanks. Have any suggestions about how to incorporate white chocolate into the batter? Melt and swirl in? Thinking a raspberry, chocolate crust, white chocolate combo.


Yo, ho, yo ho. A pirate's life for me!

 

#68 2005-11-23 12:09:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Melt the chocolate in the milk and swirl is one option (make sure it's cooled a bit before adding to the batter).  White chocolate is a delicate flavor so it may not stand out in the batter.  You might be better off topping the cake with a white chocolate ganache instead (it'll hide cracks too).

I've never tried adding berries in the batter, so I don't know how that would work out.


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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#69 2005-11-23 12:11:00

Em
Mantis
From: Didjabringabeeralong, XXX
Registered: 2004-12-28
Posts: 43864

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Cyan - was thinking of purreeing (sp?) the berries and marbeling 'em in before baking?

Or, maybe, just topping the thing with fresh berries right before serving?

Or serving with a berry puree on the side?

Or all three at once?


Yo, ho, yo ho. A pirate's life for me!

 

#70 2005-11-23 12:15:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Heck, try all three and tell me how it turns out!  I would suggest folding whole berries (nice firm, dry ones) into batter vs. puree & swirl, more impact that way.


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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Proud Member of the Log Brigade

 

#71 2005-12-14 12:42:00

ylvs
Mantis
From: Art Central
Registered: 2001-06-19
Posts: 13410

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

My favourite drink of the season:
(and this time I aready did the math for you!)

PUNSCH

Take:

350g = 1 3/4 cups of sugar

5 cloves

4 star anise

1/2 a vanilla bean (cut open)

1 cinnamon stick

5 crushed allspice corns (Piment)

a little dash of nutmeg

4 oranges (one organic)

2 organic lemons

3/4l = 3 cups of brown rum

Dissolve the sugar in  3/8l = 1 1/2 cups of water.

Heat it with all the spices and the peels of the organic orange and lemons.

(Attention! You have to peel the fruits very thinly, if too much of the "white stuff" gets in the whole thing becomes bitter!)

Let it boil properly for a few seconds, then simmer for another five minutes.

Add the juice of lemons and oranges.

Filter through some cloth or whatever (I generally use a cloth diaper - yes, an unused one) to gain only the liquid.

Mix it with the rum.

Put in bottles.

Make tea (black).

Mix tea and punsch 2/3 to 1/3.

Enjoy!

One receipe makes approx 4,5l = 1 quart 2 cups of beverage.

I used the US/metric index of my US cook book

1/4 cup = 2 fluid ounces = 50 ml
1/3 cup = 3 fluid ounces = 75 ml 
1/2 cup = 4 fluid ounces = 125 ml
1 cup = 8 fluid ounces = 250 ml

but I somehow doubt that the figures are correct...

 

#72 2005-12-14 17:06:00

Em
Mantis
From: Didjabringabeeralong, XXX
Registered: 2004-12-28
Posts: 43864

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

My, that does look tasty, Ylvs. *pondering Christmas Eve and Christmas Day*

Might be a good treat to have around for guests, served up in clear mugs with a cinnamon stick.


Yo, ho, yo ho. A pirate's life for me!

 

#73 2005-12-14 18:54:00

strangeshe
Hierarch
From: Texas
Registered: 2001-06-04
Posts: 11556

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

Mmm. I might just have to try that one.

Lately I've been on a Hot Buttered Rum kick.

Take a mug, add a shot (or two) of rum, a spoon of sugar or sweetener equivalent (to taste), fill mug with hot (not boiling) water, and top with a pat of butter. Stir 'til butter melts.

Okay. Now I need one.
*toddies off* ;)

 

#74 2005-12-14 19:16:00

cyan
Mantis
From: Magic Loft of Design & Wonder
Registered: 2005-02-16
Posts: 26887

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

That does sound yummy Ylvs.  But, alas, rum and my stomach don't agree with each other.


"Never underestimate the power and accuracy of a chicken-chucking trebuchet." ~ Tad

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Proud Member of the Log Brigade

 

#75 2005-12-15 10:46:00

Jendaiya
Pilgrim
From: Canada
Registered: 2001-06-01
Posts: 21847
Website

Re: The Rhubarb Pie

I have a question: Does anyone know if rice crispy squares freeze well? If they do I could make bunches ahead of time...


Beauty will save the world.

~Prince Myshkin,

The Idiot, by Dostoevsky

 

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